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CONNECTICUT PAUGUSSETT INDIANS

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The Indians instructed them in the manner of planting and dressing the Indian corn.

They carried them upon their backs, through rivers and waters; and, as occasion required, served them instead of boats and bridges. They gave them much useful information respecting the country, and when the English or their children were lost in the woods, and were in danger of perishing with hunger and cold, they conducted them to their wigwams, fed them, and restored them to their families and parents.

 

Benjamin Trumbull, History of Connecticut

Final Determination of the Golden Hill Paugussett Tribe -Connecticut - 1996

 

Introduction 

 

 

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New!

 

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amazon.com

 

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  Click for excerpt

 

 

Sheila Sabo's

Fairfield Archaeology

 

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Munson-Osborne

Archaeology Site

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Thomas Munson

Soldier in the Pequot War

 

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The SouthportGlobe


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Indian Map of Connecticut

 

 

Early Connecticut Maps

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Colonial Archives Blog:

http://connecticutarchives.blogspot.com/

 

 

 

 

If you have any questions email me: shesabo@netzero.net

 

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Copyright 1999-2013

 

 

  

THE HISTORY OF STRATFORD

SAMUEL ORCUTT

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Golden Hill Indians

The Wepawaug
Cupheags and Pequannock
Weantinock
Goodyear's Island
Indian Slaves
Indian Remnants
Indian Troubles
New Indian Papers

 

 

A HISTORY OF THE OLD TOWN

OF DERBY

SAMUEL ORCUTT

 

Deed from the Paugasuck Indians. " Twenty parcels of land, by their names distinguished as follows:

Wecobemeus, that land upon the brook, or small river that comes through the straight [Straitsville] northward of Lebanon, and runs into Naugatuck river at the south end of Mattatuck bounds, called by the English Beacon Hill Brook, and Packawackuck, or Agawacomuck, and Watapeck, Pacaquarock, Mequnhattacke, Musquauke, Mamusqunke, Squapmasutte, Wachu, which nine parcels of land lie on the east side of Naugatuck River southward from Mattatuck town, which comprises all the land below, betwixt the forementioned river, Beacon Hill Brook and the hither end of Judd's meadows, called by the name Squontk, and from Naugatuck River eastward to Wallingford and New Haven bounds, with all the lowlands upon the two brooks forementioned.

And eleven parcels on the west side; the first parcel called, Suracasko; the rest as follows: Petowtucki, Wequarunsh, Capage, Cocumpasuck, Megenhuttack, Panooctan, Mattuckhott, Cocacoko, Gawuskesucko, Towantuck, [the only name that has survived], and half the cedar swamp, with the land adjacent from it eastward; which land lies southward of Quasapaug pond; we say to run an east line from there to Naugatuck river; all of which parcels of land forementioned lying southward from said line, and extend or are comprised within the butments following; from the forementioned swamp, a strait line to be run to the middle of Towantuck Pond or the cedar swamp, a south line which is the west bounds towards Woodbury, and an east line from Towantuck pond, to be the butment south, and Naugatuck river the east butment, till we come to Achetaqupag, or Maruscopag, and then to butt upon the east side of the river upon the forementioned lands,these parcels of land lying and being within the township of Mattatuck, bounded as aforesaid, situate on each side of Naugatuck and Mattatuck rivers."

 

 

THE INDIANS OF THE HOUSATONIC

AND NAUGATUCK VALLEYS

SAMUEL ORCUTT

 

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THE HOUSATONIC

CHARD POWERS SMITH

The Promised Land
Heathen in the Land
The Lord's Scouts

The Land and The Lord

The Next Seven Tribes

 
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THE HISTORY OF STRATFORD

Wm. Howard Wilcoxson

Stratford Indians

Trouble with the Indians

Establishing Title to the Land

Indian Deeds and Relics

White Hills Purchase

 

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 COLONIAL DAYS

 WILBUR F. GORDY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Connecticut Circa 1623

Its Indian Trails, Villages,

and Sachemdoms

 

 

 

 

 

 

THE HISTORY OF CONNECTICUT

BENJAMIN TRUMBULL

 

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The Perfect Savages

Government

Language

Religion

Marriage

Wampum

Red Ochre

New Haven Colony

 

 

 

At New Haven a number of Indians were killed in a skirmish or battle, and the same in Stratford where the fugitives were joined by the Pequannock Indians and finally the flying Indians took refuge in a swamp, now located a little north of the village of Southport, where they were surrounded, and after hard fighting some escaped with their lives.

 

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JOHN MASON

A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE

PEQUOT WAR

 

PHILIP VINCENT

A TRUE RELATION OF THE LATE BATTELL FOUGHT IN NEW ENGLAND

 

LION GARDENER

GARDENER'S NARRATIVE

 

CAPTAIN JOHN UNDERHILL

NEWS FROM AMERICA

 

 

 

SOLDIERS OF THE PEQUOT WAR

 

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SOUTHPORT SWAMP

 

Great Swamp Fight

Incident at Mill River

Colonial History of Pequot Swamp

 

COLONIAL INDIAN ARCHIVES

 

Stratford Colonial Land Deeds

Fairfield Colonial Land Deeds

Derby Colonial Land Deeds

 

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Patriarch To The Indians

Thomas Mayhew 1593-1662

 

 

Johnson's Wonder-Working

Providence

1628-1651

 

 

Connecticut's Colonial & Continental Money

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A NARRATIVE HISTORY OF KING PHILIP'S WAR

And the

Indian Troubles in New England

RICHARD MARKHAM

 
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WINTHROP'S JOURNAL

THE HISTORY OF NEW ENGLAND

 

 

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John Gallopp and John Oldham, heretofore described as adventurous sailors and traders along the coast, stand now as the prominent figures at the outset of the Pequot war.

John Gallop, with one man more, and two little boys, coming from Connecticut in a bark of twenty tons, intending to put in at Long Island to trade, and being at the mouth of the harbor, were forced, by a sudden change of the wind, to bear up for Block Island or Fisher's Island, lying before Narragansett, where they espied a small pinnace, which, drawing near unto, they found to be Mr. Oldham's (an old planter,1 and a member of Watertown congregation, who had been long out a trading, having with him only two English boys, and two Indians of Narragansett). So they hailed him, but had no answer; and the deck was full of Indians, (fourteen in all,) and a canoe was gone from her full of Indians and goods. Whereupon they suspected they had killed John Oldham, and the rather, because the Indians let slip and set up sail, being two miles from shore, and the wind and tide being off the shore of the island, whereby they drove towards the main at Narragansett. Whereupon they went ahead of them, and having but two pieces and two pistols, and nothing but duck shot, they bear up near the Indians, (who stood ready armed with guns, pikes, and swords,) and let fly among them, and so galled them as they all gate under hatches. Then they stood off again, and returning with a good gale, they stemmed her upon the quarter and almost overset her, which so frightened the Indians, as six of them leaped overboard and were drowned. Yet they durst not board her, but stood off again, and fitted their anchor, so as, stemming her the second time, they bored her bow through with their anchor, and so sticking fast to her, they made divers shot through her, (being but inch board,) and so raked her fore and aft, as they must needs kill or hurt some of the Indians; but, seeing none of them come forth, they gate loose from her and stood off again. Then four or five more of the Indians leaped into the sea, and were likewise drowned. So there being now but four left in her, they boarded her; whereupon one Indian came up and yielded; him they bound and put into hold. Then another yielded, whom they bound. But John Gallop, being well acquainted with their skill to untie themselves, if two of them be together, and having no place to keep them asunder, he threw him bound into [the] sea; and, looking about, they found John Oldham under an old seine, stark naked, his head cleft to the brains, and his hand and legs cut as if they had been cutting them off, and yet warm. So they put him into the sea; but could not get to the other two Indians, who were in a little room underneath, with their swords. So they took the goods which were left, and the sails, etc., and towed the boat away; but night coming on, and the wind rising, they were forced to turn her off, and the wind carried her to the Narragansett shore.

 

(Winthrop's Journal July 1636)

 

 

EARLY NEW HAVEN

Sarah Day Woodward

 

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FAIRFIELD ANCIENT AND MODERN

FRANK SAMUEL CHILD

 

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An Old New England Town

FRANK SAMUEL CHILD

 
 

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GUIDE TO PUTNAM MEMORIAL CAMP

 

 

NEWGATE PRISON

ITS INSURRECTIONS,

ITS MINES,

IMPRISONMENT OF THE TORIES

DURING THE REVOLUTION